By on. This is a hot gardening topic these days and many of the organic gardeners are promoting the idea that you should add molasses to your compost pile and to your garden. Molasses; should you eat it, or dump it onto your soil? You have come to the right place to get the facts. Molasses is a by-product produced during the manufacture of sugar. Sugar cane or sugar beets are processed so that the sugar can be extracted.

The material that is left after most of the sugar is removed is a black sticky material called molasses. Molasses contains sugar, some other carbohydrates, vitamins and a number of minerals like calcium and iron.

You probably know that it is important to have microbes in your soil. If having microbes is important, than it makes sense that you should feed those microbes.

Feeding them will make them healthy, and make them reproduce so that you have even more microbes. Guess what? Microbes, especially the bacteria, love sugar. So far it all seems to make sense. Microbes are good for soil, and molasses is good for microbes, so why not add it to soil? The short answer is that there is nothing wrong with adding molasses to your garden, or to your compost pile. It will feed the microbes. Understanding why the answer is no will help you understand your garden.

In a normal garden, or compost pile, you have a large variety of microbes, all going about their daily lives. They find something to eat, they poop, and they die. This is a continual process that goes on a billion times a second. Microbes are opportunistic in that their populations will increase and decrease as the conditions change.

In that case the microbe populations remain steady. Things are chugging along at a normal pace and everybody is happy. Now you dump a lot of molasses on the garden. Instantly, microbes sense the extra food and they start to multiply. Bacteria can divide ie double the population every 20 minutes.

The population explodes very quickly. All those bacteria need to eat, and they quickly consume the molasses you added. As the food source runs out there is a massive famine and most of the bacteria die. Not much. It is true that all of the dead bacteria go on to feed other microbes, and they help build soil structure.Have you heard of cannabis growers using molasses to boost their plant yields?

Using molasses or other sugars is a popular cannabis growing technique due to the low cost and ease of use. Molasses helps your cannabis plants grow bigger buds by enriching the soil and improving the growing environment.

The soil breaks the sugar down to carbohydrates which feed bacteria in the soil. This is how I use molasses with my plants. One study conducted at Colorado State University found that Mammoth P a soil bacteria additive led to larger, more robust [cannabis] plants that yielded So I recommend using molasses in combination with rhizobacteria.

You can buy molasses and rhizobacteria for next to nothing. You can also use molasses as an organic insecticide. Using chemical nutrients can result in salt accumulation in your soil. If that goes unchecked, the soil pH can get thrown off and your cannabis plant can experience nutrient lockup.

The molasses itself never gets absorbed into the cannabis plant, it only acts as a booster to the soil as I described earlier.

Using Molasses To Grow Cannabis – When, Why, and How

While I never really noticed a taste difference, we know peoples taste vary widely, so its possible some growers may think it affects taste. A grower in an old thread about molasses on GrassCity said this about their experience:. Ever since I found out about molasses and tried it I have no regrets!

I too was skeptical about it at first, but after experimenting with it in my second grow I am convinced that molasses is the way to go. Just stating my personal opinion and experience!

molasses for plants

Molasses during veg is not as essential as it is during the flowering phase, and therefore I use less of it during the vegetative phase. During flowering you can increase the total amount of molasses you use. Since molasses is organic and not as rich as chemical nutrients, you can be a lot more flexible with the dosing without risking damage to your cannabis plants. The NPK value of molasses is roughlythere may be slight variation between brands.

With that said, you should definitely regularly monitor your soil pH because molasses can change soil pH which will lead to other problems. Yes, you can mix molasses with other nutrients.

Molasses for Plants

When should you add molasses to your plants? Should you use molasses during veg or flowering? When do you stop using molasses?

As I said earlier, I use significantly less molasses during veg than I do during flowering. When do you stop using molasses to grow cannabis? You can stop using it a weeks before harvest. You want the unsuphured version only. Cannabis growers have been known to experiment with substitutes for molasses — other sugars that break down in the soil and perform a similar job.

I want to be clear that molasses is the best option of all the organic sweet nutrients you can use to grow cannabis. The whole function is for the soil to break them down into carbs that feed your soil microbes. Blackstrap unsulphured molasses is the best type of molasses to use for cannabis growing. You can also use unsulphured dry molasses.

Growers have used agave syrup, corn syrup, or honey as an organic nutrient for growing cannabis, although unsulphured molasses is the most effective.Looking for an easy, low cost way to feed your plants? Consider feeding plants with molasses. Molasses plant fertilizer is a great way to grow healthy plants and as an added benefit, using molasses in gardens can help fend off pests.

Molasses is the by-product of beating sugarcanegrapes or sugar beets into sugar. The dark, rich, and somewhat sweet liquid is commonly used as a sweetener in baked goods, as a natural remedy for many ailments, and added to animal feed. Even though it is a by-product, molasses is full of vitamins and minerals. As a result, molasses as fertilizer is possible too. Using molasses in organic gardening practices is nothing new.

The sugar refinement process goes through three stages, each yielding a type of molasses product. Blackstrap molasses is created from the third boiling of sugar in the refinement process. Blackstrap molasses is high in calciummagnesiumiron and potassium.

It also contains sulfur and a host of micronutrients. Using molasses as fertilizer provides plants with a quick source of energy and encourages the growth of beneficial microorganisms. Unsulphered blackstrap molasses is commonly added to organic fertilizers to give plants the necessary carbohydrates and trace minerals that they need to be healthy. Molasses can be added to organic liquid fertilizers, compost teaalfalfa meal tea and kelpto name a few.

When molasses is added to organic fertilizersit provides food for the healthy microbes in the soil. The greater amount of microbial activity in the soil, the healthier plants will be. Add molasses at a rate of 1 to 3 tablespoons to 1 gallon of fertilizer for best results.

Molasses can also be added to water and sprayed on plant leaves or poured on the soil. When the molasses is sprayed directly on plant leaves, the nutrients and sugar are absorbed quickly, and nutrients are immediately available. Using molasses in gardens has the additional benefit of fighting off pests. Because molasses increases the overall vitality of plants, pests are less likely to attack your garden.

Use a molasses and water mixture every two weeks, in addition to your molasses fertilizer, for best results. Molasses plant fertilizer is an excellent non-toxic and cost effective way to keep your plants happy and pest free.

Friend's Email Address.Hi Phil,I received several of your products. My questions are related to how much of the product to use if I am using a 2 gallon backpack sprayer. Anyway, how much dextrose and how much NPK plus Calcium product per gallon.

How much BioAg probiotic EM per gallon in a back pack sprayer. Thanks for converting these amounts for us backpack sprayer folks. Hopefully, next year I can invest in a hose end sprayer.

But when using a backpack sprayer, I have gone down to just to save my back, so 2 Tbsp per gallon of water. The mist can be very fine on the NPK and dextrose. I plan to purchase the dextrose for the garden, but I was reading about the benefits of blackstrap molasses on another website and was wondering if the brand that you sell is ok for direct human consumption or is it just for garden use.

OK thanks, I just wanted to make sure I am thinking right I mean, that may not be the best indicator; but one out of a whole bunch is better than none—lol.

Molasses Food for The Soil ~ Noreen's Garden

Can you tell me if molasses becomes too old to be effective? It can go bad. If it smells bad or if you see mold, toss it. But it does often last for a few years, so may still be fine. And if so, do you also recommend using it combined with molasses? And what would be the rate used for pasture? People definitely use the seaweed on lawns and pastures, but I have no test data. Molasses is occasionally used, but less so.

I am new to all the organic gardening but am hoping to try a few recommended things. Thatn said I am confused- I was told to do the compost tea foliar feeding, but then also read something about what seems like a simpler option- with mixing molasses, kelp, AEM and epsom salt- as a foliar feed.

I was going to buy the stuff to ry both, but I dont want to over do the whole thing. Please help me sort this out. Best, Amy. Good question, Amy. All can be very helpful, but as to how helpful, that depends on the garden. When applying to individual plants, mixed 2 tbsp per gallon. How much tea do you apply to each plant? Click to see full products list. Blackstrap Molasses - 1 Quart quantity.

Get It Here. Phil on March 8, at pm. Elena on March 25, at pm. Phil on March 25, at pm. Elena on March 30, at am. Thank you very much!

I appreciate your thorough response.Looking for an easy, low cost way to feed your plants? Consider feeding plants with molasses. Molasses plant fertilizer is a great way to grow healthy plants and as an added benefit, using molasses in gardens can help fend off pests.

Molasses for Plants

Molasses is the by-product of beating sugarcanegrapes or sugar beets into sugar. The dark, rich, and somewhat sweet liquid is commonly used as a sweetener in baked goods, as a natural remedy for many ailments, and added to animal feed.

Even though it is a by-product, molasses is full of vitamins and minerals. As a result, molasses as fertilizer is possible too. Using molasses in organic gardening practices is nothing new. The sugar refinement process goes through three stages, each yielding a type of molasses product. Blackstrap molasses is created from the third boiling of sugar in the refinement process. Blackstrap molasses is high in calciummagnesiumiron and potassium. It also contains sulfur and a host of micronutrients.

Using molasses as fertilizer provides plants with a quick source of energy and encourages the growth of beneficial microorganisms. Unsulphered blackstrap molasses is commonly added to organic fertilizers to give plants the necessary carbohydrates and trace minerals that they need to be healthy. Molasses can be added to organic liquid fertilizers, compost teaalfalfa meal tea and kelpto name a few. When molasses is added to organic fertilizersit provides food for the healthy microbes in the soil.

The greater amount of microbial activity in the soil, the healthier plants will be. Add molasses at a rate of 1 to 3 tablespoons to 1 gallon of fertilizer for best results. Molasses can also be added to water and sprayed on plant leaves or poured on the soil. When the molasses is sprayed directly on plant leaves, the nutrients and sugar are absorbed quickly, and nutrients are immediately available.

Using molasses in gardens has the additional benefit of fighting off pests. Because molasses increases the overall vitality of plants, pests are less likely to attack your garden.

Use a molasses and water mixture every two weeks, in addition to your molasses fertilizer, for best results. Molasses plant fertilizer is an excellent non-toxic and cost effective way to keep your plants happy and pest free. Keep up to date with all that's happening in and around the garden. Sign up for our newsletter. Friend's Email Address. Your Name. Your Email Address. Send Email. Image by Marshall. What is Molasses?

Feeding Plants with Molasses Using molasses in organic gardening practices is nothing new. Types of Molasses Fertilizer Unsulphered blackstrap molasses is commonly added to organic fertilizers to give plants the necessary carbohydrates and trace minerals that they need to be healthy. Pest-Free Gardens Using molasses in gardens has the additional benefit of fighting off pests.

Did you find this helpful? Share it with your friends!Growing marijuana is often considered a form of art, with many who have dedicated years to perfecting and selectively breeding the weed strains that we all know and love so much today.

Though beginners do have great success since most cannabis species are relatively hardy, but those with experience will tell you that feeding your plants the essential nutrients are what will result in a harvest to be truly proud of.

You could ask around to find out your friends most commonly used methods, but there are so many ways to feed cannabis plants that the answers you will receive will be inconsistent.

So much so that it might even feel a little overwhelming at first. Here, we will focus on using molasses as food for growing marijuana plants including how to use it, the benefits, and how it works.

Molasses typically comes in a jar and is a thick, viscous syrup that is extracted from raw sugar cane as it is refined into granulated and icing sugars.

A lot of people know molasses to be a cooking ingredient that is often used to sweeten dishes, but the kind that is required for growing marijuana are organic.

molasses for plants

If you try to use an average bottle of molasses, it will contain hundreds of additives that might harm cannabis, so it is critical that garden use certified molasses be purchased for this task.

Molasses are typically applied when growing marijuana either through daily watering or a super soil mixture. No matter which way they are given, the soils will absorb the sugars and break them down into carbohydrates which are an excellent foodfor microbes.

The microbes will then consume the sugars and in turn release additional CO2 which cannabis plants love to feed off of, and require to thrive. There is a great deal of debate over the ideal way to use molasses effectively. For those who are just learning how to grow weedadministering through watering may be the most successful. Others prefer to mix molasses in combination with a super soil recipe or regular veggies plant soil.

Use either the directions located on the product or the one provided below to combine the water and molasses. This solution should only be used from the flowering stage until two weeks before harvest. This particular recipe can be added to any vegetable safe soil three to seven days in advance of using it to plant cannabis seedlings. Home News Growing.

How to grow weed using molasses Published May 13, p. Canadian Press, Graeme Roy Growing marijuana is often considered a form of art, with many who have dedicated years to perfecting and selectively breeding the weed strains that we all know and love so much today.

What is molasses? Why are molasses effective nutrients for growing marijuana? How to grow weed with molasses There is a great deal of debate over the ideal way to use molasses effectively.

molasses for plants

Growing marijuana with molasses and water solution Use either the directions located on the product or the one provided below to combine the water and molasses. The results of a properly administered dose of molasses on a regular basis is a healthier plant that produces bigger buds.

Molasses will work well on any kind of weed strain.

Molasses As Fertilizer: Information On Feeding Plants With Molasses

Molasses are easily accessible and non-toxic. Makes an excellent soil base. Reduces mineral and vitamin nutritional issues. Reduces the natural salt build up that can lead to nutritional problems.By on. This is a hot gardening topic these days and many of the organic gardeners are promoting the idea that you should add molasses to your compost pile and to your garden. Molasses; should you eat it, or dump it onto your soil? You have come to the right place to get the facts.

Molasses is a by-product produced during the manufacture of sugar. Sugar cane or sugar beets are processed so that the sugar can be extracted. The material that is left after most of the sugar is removed is a black sticky material called molasses. Molasses contains sugar, some other carbohydrates, vitamins and a number of minerals like calcium and iron. You probably know that it is important to have microbes in your soil. If having microbes is important, than it makes sense that you should feed those microbes.

Feeding them will make them healthy, and make them reproduce so that you have even more microbes. Guess what? Microbes, especially the bacteria, love sugar. So far it all seems to make sense. Microbes are good for soil, and molasses is good for microbes, so why not add it to soil?

The short answer is that there is nothing wrong with adding molasses to your garden, or to your compost pile. It will feed the microbes. Understanding why the answer is no will help you understand your garden. In a normal garden, or compost pile, you have a large variety of microbes, all going about their daily lives. They find something to eat, they poop, and they die. This is a continual process that goes on a billion times a second.

Microbes are opportunistic in that their populations will increase and decrease as the conditions change. In that case the microbe populations remain steady. Things are chugging along at a normal pace and everybody is happy.

Now you dump a lot of molasses on the garden. Instantly, microbes sense the extra food and they start to multiply. Bacteria can divide ie double the population every 20 minutes. The population explodes very quickly. All those bacteria need to eat, and they quickly consume the molasses you added.

As the food source runs out there is a massive famine and most of the bacteria die.

molasses for plants

Not much. It is true that all of the dead bacteria go on to feed other microbes, and they help build soil structure. The minerals in the molasses stay in the soil and plants can use them, but your soil probably had enough calcium and iron before you added the molasses.

The vitamins in molasses are of no value to plants. Is the massive population explosion good for your plants? Molasses might make your compost pile work quicker, but the first rain, or your hose, will wash the sugars out of the pile removing any benefits. However, there are many ways to do this.

Adding compost, wood chips or other organic matter as a mulch is the best way.


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